A new archaeological exhibition opening Friday in Berlin reveals how Germany has been at the heart of trade, migration, conflict and innovation since the Stone Age.

The Sept. 20, 2018 photo shows an archeological exhibition with pieces of the Roman-era displayed at the Martin-Gropius-Bau museum in Berlin. The new exhibition showcasing more than 1,000 major archaeological finds from the past 20 years shows reveals how Germany has been at the heart of European trade, migration, conflict and innovation since the Stone Age. The exhibition runs from Sept. 21, 2018 until Jan. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
Venus von Hohle Fels, an ivory figurine dating back to between 40,000 and 35,000 BC, displayed at the Martin-Gropius-Bau museum in Berlin, Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. The new exhibition showcasing more than 1,000 major archaeological finds from the past 20 years shows reveals how Germany has been at the heart of European trade, migration, conflict and innovation since the Stone Age. The exhibition runs from Sept. 21, 2018 until Jan. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Frank Jordans)

Objects include a sleek, 300,000-year-old wooden spear used by one of the pre-human species that roamed the continent long before humans arrived, and a spectacular set of hats made from sheet gold believed to have held religious significance for the early Celtic people of Europe more than 3,000 years ago.

In this Sept. 20, 2018 photo the so-called Sky Disc of Nebra, made of bronze and gold, from 1,600 BC. is displayed at an archeological exhibition at the Martin-Gropius-Bau museum in Berlin. The new exhibition showcasing more than 1,000 major archaeological finds from the past 20 years shows reveals how Germany has been at the heart of European trade, migration, conflict and innovation since the Stone Age. The exhibition runs from Sept. 21, 2018 until Jan. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
The Sept. 20, 2018 photo shows the Golden Hat of Schifferstadt, right, with a similar object found in France and another of unknown origin, all from about 1,300 BC. displayed at an archeological exhibition at the Martin-Gropius-Bau museum in Berlin. The new exhibition showcasing more than 1,000 major archaeological finds from the past 20 years shows reveals how Germany has been at the heart of European trade, migration, conflict and innovation since the Stone Age. The exhibition runs from Sept. 21, 2018 until Jan. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
In this Sept. 20, 2018 photo a River God Mask from Roman-era in Cologne is displayed at an archeological exhibition at the Martin-Gropius-Bau museum in Berlin. The new exhibition showcasing more than 1,000 major archaeological finds from the past 20 years shows reveals how Germany has been at the heart of European trade, migration, conflict and innovation since the Stone Age. The exhibition runs from Sept. 21, 2018 until Jan. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

Remains from one of the world’s oldest known battlefields, discovered by chance in the Tollense valley of northeastern Germany, attest to a bloody past, while artifacts from across the Roman Empire unearthed in Cologne prove it was an early melting pot of cultures.

In this Sept. 20, 2018 photo the so-called Sky Disc of Nebra, made of bronze and gold, from 1,600 BC. is displayed at an archeological exhibition at the Martin-Gropius-Bau museum in Berlin. The new exhibition showcasing more than 1,000 major archaeological finds from the past 20 years shows reveals how Germany has been at the heart of European trade, migration, conflict and innovation since the Stone Age. The exhibition runs from Sept. 21, 2018 until Jan. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
A woman’s folding chair made from silver, dated to about 450 AD, displayed at the Martin-Gropius-Bau museum in Berlin, Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. The new exhibition showcasing more than 1,000 major archaeological finds from the past 20 years shows reveals how Germany has been at the heart of European trade, migration, conflict and innovation since the Stone Age. The exhibition runs from Sept. 21, 2018 until Jan. 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Frank Jordans)

The exhibition at Berlin’s Gropius Bau museum runs until Jan. 6.

Source: The Associated Press

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