A measure on San Francisco’s Nov. 6 ballot would raise taxes on the city’s wealthiest companies to help thousands of homeless and mentally ill residents.

Proposition C is the latest battle between big business and social services advocates who demand that corporate America pay to solve inequities exacerbated by its success.

In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2018, San Francisco native Tracey Mixon stands on a street in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco. Mixon, 47, and her daughter were recently evicted from their two-bedroom home. She hopes San Francisco voters will approve Proposition C on the Nov. 6 ballot, which would levy an extra tax on some businesses to raise $300 million a year for homelessness and mental health services. (AP Photo/Janie Har)

In San Francisco, it’s also become an intriguing fight between recently elected Mayor London Breed, who is opposed, and philanthropist Marc Benioff, who supports the measure. His company is the city’s largest private employer.

In this Oct. 1, 2018 photo, Sunshine Powers, owner of the store Love on Haight, right, hugs Christin Evans, owner of The Booksmith, outside of Powers’ store in San Francisco. A measure on San Francisco’s Nov. 6 ballot would levy an extra tax on hundreds of the city’s wealthiest companies to raise $300 million for homelessness and mental health services. It’s the latest battle between big business and social services advocates who say that companies such as Amazon, Google and Salesforce can afford to help solve severe inequities caused by business success. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

The measure is expected to raise up to $300 million a year, nearly doubling what the incredibly rich city already spends on battling a decades-old problem.

In this Oct. 1, 2018 photo, Christin Evans, owner of The Booksmith, carries her dog Joey Pistachio as she crosses Ashbury Street along Haight Street in San Francisco. A measure on San Francisco’s Nov. 6 ballot would levy an extra tax on hundreds of the city’s wealthiest companies to raise $300 million for homelessness and mental health services. It’s the latest battle between big business and social services advocates who say that companies such as Amazon, Google and Salesforce can afford to help solve severe inequities caused by business success. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

In June, Seattle leaders repealed a per-employee tax that would have raised $50 million a year after Amazon pushed back.

Source: The Associated Press

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