A nuclear test reactor that can melt uranium fuel rods in seconds is running again after a near quarter-century shutdown as U.S. officials try to revamp a fading nuclear power industry with safer fuel designs and a new generation of power plants.

This Nov. 29, 2018 photo, shows the transient test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho. (AP Photo/Keith Riddler)
This Nov. 29, 2018 photo, shows the transient test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho. (AP Photo/Keith Riddler)

Officials say 10 nuclear fuel tests have gone smoothly at the Transient Reactor Test Facility at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory in eastern Idaho since its restart late last year.

In this Nov. 29, 2018 photo, J.R. Biggs stands in front of the Transient Test Reactor he manages in Idaho Falls, Idaho. (AP Photo/Keith Riddler)
In this Nov. 29, 2018 photo, J.R. Biggs stands in front of the Transient Test Reactor he manages in Idaho Falls, Idaho. (AP Photo/Keith Riddler)
This Nov. 29, 2018 photo shows the exterior of the Transient Reactor Test Facility at Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho. (AP Photo/Keith Riddler)
This Nov. 29, 2018 photo shows the exterior of the Transient Reactor Test Facility at Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho. (AP Photo/Keith Riddler)

It’s part of a strategy to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by increasing nuclear power initiated under the Obama administration and continuing under the Trump administration.

In this Nov. 29, 2018 photo, hot cell operators Dawnette Hunter, left, and Scot White manipulate radioactive material from behind 4-foot-thick leaded glass at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho. (AP Photo/Keith Riddler)
In this Nov. 29, 2018 photo, hot cell operators Dawnette Hunter, left, and Scot White manipulate radioactive material from behind 4-foot-thick leaded glass at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho. (AP Photo/Keith Riddler)

Officials say the Idaho test reactor could help develop accident-tolerant fuels and more efficient nuclear plants needed to replace aging plants that produce 20 percent of the nation’s energy.

Source: The Associated Press